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CAGE FREE EGGS

Cage Free Eggs

Cage-free eggs are produced by hens that are not confined to small cages and have the freedom to roam and express natural behaviors. These eggs have become increasingly popular among consumers due to concerns about animal welfare and ethical treatment of laying hens. While not inherently of higher quality, cage-free eggs may be perceived as more ethical, sustainable, and appealing to some customers. Cage-free eggs are used in the same way as conventional eggs, providing an essential ingredient for countless recipes. They are a versatile component in any kitchen, often used for breakfast dishes, baked goods, and sauces. As eggs are a great source of protein, vitamins, and minerals, incorporating cage-free eggs into one's diet can be an easy way to support more humane egg production methods.
#2
IN EGGS
140
CAL / 100G
$0.15
AVG / OZ
cage free eggs
0%
CARBS
45%
FAT
55%
PROTEIN
Cage Free Eggs FAQ
Cooking with cage-free eggs has the potential to elevate the quality and taste of your dishes. Make sure to check the freshness of the eggs before cooking, as they can change flavors and textures noticeably as they age. It’s also essential to take care while cooking eggs, as high heat can result in rubbery textures. Knowing when to salt your eggs is another commonly overlooked step. For scrambled or omelettes, it's best to add salt after cooking as it can break down the eggs and result in a more watery dish. Another little known trick for whipping egg whites is to make sure your bowl and beaters are completely free from oils and always start at a low speed and gradually increase as the foam forms. This will result in stiffer and more stable peaks. Many people can go wrong when trying to peel boiled eggs. A handy tip is to add a teaspoon of baking soda to the boiling water, making the shell come off much easier. Lastly, remember to never wash eggs before storing as this can remove the protective cuticle, increasing the chance of bacterial contamination. Clean them just before use. Overall, being mindful of these tips can help you get the most out of your cage-free eggs.
What's the difference between cage-free and regular eggs?
Are cage-free eggs healthier?
Do cage-free eggs taste different?
Why are my scrambled eggs watery?
How do I make my egg whites stiff?
How do I stop boiled eggs from cracking?
Can I fry cage-free eggs?
How can I peel boiled eggs easily?
How can I tell if my eggs are still fresh?
Should I wash my eggs before storing?
Expiration & Storage Tips
When does cage free eggs expire?
Unopened cage-free eggs keep fresh for three to five weeks in the fridge and are still good to eat a couple of weeks after the 'sell by' date. After opening, it's best to use the eggs within two weeks. Unfortunately, freezing raw eggs isn't recommended because the yolks tend to become gelatinous and inedible. However, you can freeze scrambled eggs or other egg-based dishes for two to three months. Homemade dishes with eggs, like a quiche or casserole, can be refrigerated for about three to four days.
How do you tell if cage free eggs is bad?
Telling if an egg has gone bad is pretty straightforward. Firstly, you could perform a simple float test. Fill a bowl with water and place the egg in it. If it sinks and lies flat on its side, it's still fresh. An older, but still edible egg will stand upright on the bottom, while a spoiled egg will float. Also, a bad egg will have a strong, pungent smell, which you'll usually notice as soon as you crack it open.
Tips for storing cage free eggs to extend shelf life
• Store your eggs in the refrigerator, ideally in their original carton which helps protect the eggs and keep them fresh. • Try to avoid storing your eggs on the fridge door, as the temperature tends to fluctuate there. Instead, place them in the main body of the fridge which stays at a more constant temperature. • Use older eggs for hard-cooking, which makes them easier to peel. Fresher eggs can go into dishes where that's not an important factor. • If you're going away and won't be able to finish your eggs before they expire, consider cracking and beating them, then freezing. They can last up to a year in the freezer this way!
EXPIRES WITHIN
3 - 6
WEEKS
Equivalents
Health Info
Macros
0g
CARBS
5g
FAT
6g
PROTEIN
Allowed on these diets
VEGETARIAN
KETO
PALEO
WHOLE 30
MEDITERRANEAN
LOW CARB
LACTOSE FREE
GLUTEN FREE
Contains these allergens
EGGS
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