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Horseradish

Horseradish is a perennial plant belonging to the Brassicaceae family, known for its large, white taproots which are traditionally used as a spicy condiment. Native to Eastern Europe and Western Asia, the use of horseradish as a food dates back to ancient times. The pungent, peppery flavor of horseradish is primarily due to the presence of volatile compounds called isothiocyanates, released when the root is grated or ground. For home cooks and consumers, horseradish enhances the flavor of various dishes, including sauces, dressings, and marinades. It is commonly used as a prepared condiment, either fresh or pickled, to pair with meats such as roast beef and seafood like smoked salmon. Its distinctive heat and aroma transform simple recipes into uniquely flavored and invigorating dishes.
#12
IN CONDIMENTS
503
CAL / 100G
$0.22
AVG / OZ
horseradish
16%
CARBS
82%
FAT
2%
PROTEIN
Horseradish FAQ
When cooking with horseradish, the common questions usually revolve around how to manage the ingredient’s intense heat and flavor, its best pairings and how to use it fresh or prepared. People often go wrong when they use too much of it in dishes, overshadowing the tastes of other ingredients. The best way to get the most out of horseradish is to add it in modest amounts first, and progressively adjust according to taste. Remember, its heat enhances other flavors, and shouldn't be the central focus of your dish. Also, grating fresh horseradish releases the full potency of its flavors, which fade over time once exposed to air and heat. A little-known tip is that the heat level can be adjusted: for milder horseradish, add vinegar immediately after grating, while for a hotter flavor, delay adding vinegar for about three minutes.
Why can't I taste the heat when I bite into a piece of horseradish?
Is horseradish the same as wasabi?
Can I use horseradish in place of hot sauce in recipes?
Why does my horseradish lose its potency over time?
What kind of dishes is horseradish best paired with?
Can I eat horseradish raw?
How can I make prepared horseradish from fresh root?
How can I adjust the heat level of the horseradish?
Why does horseradish make my eyes water?
How can I grate horseradish without my eyes watering?
Expiration & Storage Tips
When does horseradish expire?
Unopened jarred or pre-packaged horseradish can last for up to a year if stored in a cool, dry pantry. Just be sure to check the best-by date. Once the jar is opened, it should be kept in the fridge and can last up to 3 to 4 months. Fresh horseradish root can last in the fridge for 1-2 weeks if kept dry. When frozen, grated horseradish can last up to 6 months.
How do you tell if horseradish is bad?
Jarred horseradish that's gone off will have a funky, off smell. If you notice this, it's safest to throw it out. The product can also spoil if it develops a color change, usually it turns a darker shade of brown and loses it's pungent aroma. Fresh horseradish root, on the other hand, should be firm. If it softens and becomes slimy, it’s time to discard it.
Tips for storing horseradish to extend shelf life
• Store fresh horseradish root in the vegetable crisper of your refrigerator wrapped loosely in a plastic bag. • For long-term storage, horseradish can be frozen. To do this, peel and grate the fresh horseradish, mix in a small amount of vinegar (to preserve it and enhance the flavor), and freeze in small portions. • Keep opened jarred horseradish in the refrigerator to retain its freshness and pungent flavor. • Do not leave horseradish out of the refrigerator for more than two hours after opening, as this can speed up the spoiling process.
EXPIRES WITHIN
10 - 15
MONTHS
Health Info
Macros
1g
CARBS
7g
FAT
0g
PROTEIN
Allowed on these diets
VEGETARIAN
KETO
PALEO
WHOLE 30
MEDITERRANEAN
LOW CARB
VEGAN
LACTOSE FREE
GLUTEN FREE
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